CORPORATE LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION & ORGANIZATION 031

Updated Monday, 3/18/13

[Prerequisite: None]

Instructor: James Matarazzo 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Over the past few decades the number of corporate libraries has increased dramatically. For over 100 years, and in spite of the changes in the economy, membership in Special Libraries Association mirrored the growth of the number of company libraries. In the past five years, however, companies have focused on cost savings in operations as one method of increasing shareholder value and some company libraries have suffered as a result.

This course will examine the history, types of libraries, staffing, development, and future of company libraries in the United States. Specific attention will be given to examples of highly successful models as well as those corporate information centers which have encountered problems. Research on the value of information professionals and the perceived value of corporate libraries are examined in detail. Methodologies to evaluate the company library will be discussed. Comparative data on corporate libraries in the U.S., Europe, and Japan will be considered.           

The concept of shareholder value has forced many firms to change the way they operate. Management's quest for increased profits has led to new efficiencies at many firms. This focus on profits, has in turn, led to outsourcing certain functions and the reduction of services in the past consider part of "doing business." These and other bottom line management decisions will be discussed.           

Students in this course should be prepared for change; change not only in the work place, but in the class as well. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA            Summer 2013                                                                          

Academic Year: 

Semester: 

Section Number: 

Course Syllabus

Course Prerequisites: 

none

Course Description: 

Over the past few decades the number of corporate libraries has increased dramatically. For over 100 years, and in spite of the changes in the economy, membership in Special Libraries Association mirrored the growth of the number of company libraries. In the past five years, however, companies have focused on cost savings in operations as one method of increasing shareholder value and some company libraries have suffered as a result.

This course will examine the history, types of libraries, staffing, development, and future of company libraries in the United States. Specific attention will be given to examples of highly successful models as well as those corporate information centers which have encountered problems. Research on the value of information professionals and the perceived value of corporate libraries are examined in detail. Methodologies to evaluate the company library will be discussed. Comparative data on corporate libraries in the U.S., Europe, and Japan will be considered.

Course Objective: 

To examine the corporate library/information center closely. 

To understand the role of the company librarian in a complex corporate organization.

To examine Special Libraries Association and the role it can play in the career development of the company librarian. 

To work as part of a team to solve problems. 

Learning Outcomes
      - Students have the ability to judge a firm before placement in a corporate position.
      - Students can assess the need for information because he/she understands the actual work of the customer.
      - Students understand the value of internal as well as external information in a company setting.

Required Course Materials: 

 

CHANGE

CHANGE

THINK

 There is nothing to purchase. Articles that must be read and case studies will be supplied by the instructor at no cost to the student. All assignments will be completed during the weeks of class.

 

Course Requirements: 

 

COURSE OUTLINE

9:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. 

Monday, May 13, 2013

A.            History of Business 

B.             Libraries in American Business and Industry 

  • Introduction to the course
  • History of company library development
  • Types and distribution of special libraries

C.             Special Libraries Association

  • SLA’s History
  • SLA Salary Surveys
  • SLA and Research

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Field Trips 

We will visit corporate libraries.          

One of the places we will visit has specific rules. No weapons of any kind (includes small pen knives) and no cell phones. No one but those on the class list may visit, including children. No cameras. 

These apply just for Tuesday, May 24, 2011. 

NOTE: There is nothing to purchase for this course. I will supply all of the readings and cases at no cost to the student.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Corporate Library Closings 

  • Beacon Gas Company
  • Maryland Glass Company
  • Winston Engineering
  • Precision Engineering Company
  • Specialty Chemical Corporation 

With your group, prepare a 10 minute oral report on the company assigned. Brief description of the firm and any reason for closure.

Be creative in your presentation.

These 5 cases represent the only record of company libraries that have closed. Other company libraries have closed since these cases were written. We do not have any data on those closures, however.

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Corporate Library Excellence

  • Allergan Pharmaceuticals
  • Chevron Corporation
  • System Planning Corporation
  • Abbott Laboratories
  • McKinsey 

With your group, prepare a 10 minute oral report on the companies assigned. Brief description of the firms and any reasons for excellence.

Be creative in your presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, May 17,2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.             Value of the Information Professional

  • SLA Task Force on the Value of the Information Professional 

B.             The Value of a Corporate Library 

  • Discuss the value of the corporate library in your group. Specifically, where is the value? 

C.            Evaluating the Corporate Library 

  • The Double Edged Sword 

D.            The Future of Corporate Libraries in the U.S.

  • External competition - fees for information service; the vendor
  • External competition - other sources
  • Internal competition
  • The corporate library of the future: possible scenarios
  • Outsourcing - Offshoring

E.             Corporate Libraries in Europe and Japan

Students work in teams.

The groups will be:

Beacon/Allergan Team
1.
2.
3.

Maryland Glass/Chevron
1.
2.
3.

Winston/McKinsey Team
1.
2.
3.
4.

Precision/Abbott Team
1.
2.
3.
4.

Specialty/System Planning Team
1.
2.
3.  

Written Assignments

 

  • First Written Paper (an individual assignment)

 

Terse Analysis: Typed 3 pages. “Did this library have to close?” Take a position and defend your position. Do not repeat the content of the case. THINK! Paper due 12 Noon, Wednesday, May 15, 2013.

 

Your analysis will be judged on the quality of the content and the clarity of the presentation. Above all else, you will be judged on the originality of your thought. All of your written work will be graded on this basis.

 

Please do not use cover sheets, binders etc. on any of the papers. These are not necessary.

 

  • Second Written Paper (an individual assignment)

 

Terse Analysis: Typed 3 pages on the Reasons for success and excellence. Do not repeat the case in your analysis. THINK!   Paper due 12 Noon. - Friday, May 17, 2013


COURSE, SCHOOL, AND UNIVERSITY POLICIES: 

Academic Code of Integrity

Students are expected to abide by The University of Arizona Code of Academic Integrity'The guiding principle of academic integrity is that a student's submitted work must be the student's own.' If you have any questions regarding what is acceptable practice under this Code, please ask an Instructor.

Accommodating Disabilities

The University has a Disability Resource Center. If you anticipate the need for reasonable accommodations to meet the requirements of this course, you must register with the Disability Resource Center and request that the DRC send me, the Instructor, official notification of your accommodation needs as soon as possible. Please plan to meet with me by appointment or during office hours to discuss accommodations and how my course requirements and activities may impact your ability to fully participate.

Assignment Policies

  • How to submit your assignments: Please submit your written assignments in paper. Your papers will be graded and returned.
  • Assignment due dates: NO LATE PAPERS!
  • Writing style: No Style Manual.
  • Late Policy: NO LATE PAPERS!

 

Course Grading: 

GRADING:

Evaluation: Class Participation 25%

Presentations 25%

Case Presentation and Analysis 50%

A   90-100
B   80-89
C   70-79
D  60-69
F  below 59

Course Policies: 

Incompletes

The current Catalog reads

The grade of I may be awarded only at the end of a term, when all but a minor portion of the course work has been satisfactorily completed. The grade of I is not to be awarded in place of a failing grade or when the student is expected to repeat the course; in such a case, a grade other than must be assigned. Students should make arrangements with the instructor to receive an incomplete grade before the end of the term ...

If the incomplete is not removed by the instructor within one year the I grade will revert to a failing grade.

INSTRUCTOR NAME AND CONTACT ADDRESSES: 

James M. Matarazzo
Simmons College
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115-5898

Fax: 617-521-3035
Email: matarazz@simmons.edu
Phone: 617-521-2815

 

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
 
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