LIS 445 Global History of Books before Gutenberg 010

Students in IRLS 445 will meet face to face twice a week. In addition, the will meet virtually in D2L with IRLS 545.

Many people think that the publication of books began after Johannes Gutenberg invented printing with moveable type in Germany around 1447. Nothing could be farther from the truth.

Books were produced in multiple copies and made available to readers from antiquity to 1447, in many publication formats and by many technologies before printing came to Western Europe. Active book cultures sprung up in ancient Greece, ancient Rome, and ancient India, as well as early China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. A vibrant book culture based on science and philosophy existed in the middle ages in Arabian countries. And finally, the European west enjoyed a robust manuscript book culture from the 1100’s, dying out only a hundred years after Gutenberg.

Jana Bradley, Professor
School of Information Resources and Library Science
SIRLS, 1515 E. First Street, Tucson, Arizona 85719
Room 2A (across the courtyard from the main office)
520-609-6448
janabrad@email.arizona.edu
office hours: Wednesday, 1-3

 

Academic Year: 

Semester: 

Course ID and Name: 

Section Number: 

Course Syllabus

Course Prerequisites: 

Undergraduate: none

 

Course Description: 

This course surveys the history of books, book publication, and book culture from early beginnings in ancient Mesopotamia to the point in each civilization studied when Gutenberg’s invention supersedes older ways of producing and publishing books. Although this date is in the 15th century for Europe, it is often considerably later around the globe.

Course Objective: 

Course Objectives and Expected Learning Outcomes

Student will

  • Recall basic terms and concepts from each lesson
  • Understand an overview of history and geography for each civilization
  • Discuss the book and reading culture of each society we study in terms of
    • Language
    • Book medium, format, and method of applying text to medium
    • Content, Book production and distribution techniques
    • Audience and Literacy
  • Will know and be able to describe at least 5 books from each civilization studied
  • Articulate characteristics of the civilization that contribute to the shape of the book culture
  • Compare book cultures across civilizations we study, noting similarities and differences
  • Develop their own digital library of books represent periods we study

Topics

We will study the book culture of the following civilizations; units for each week are listed below

 

  1. Introduction to the class and to historical time designations
  2. Mesopotamia (1/2 week)
  3. Ancient Africa and Egypt
  4. Ancient Greece
  5. Hellenistic Greek Empire
  6. Ancient Rome to the Fall of the Western Roman Empire
  7. China—Ancient and Middle Ages, part 1
  8. Mid-term review and mid-terms
  9. Eastern Roman Empire from Constantine to the fall of the Eastern Empire
  10. India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam
  11. Western Europe: early Middle Ages
  12. Islam and the Arabic Empire from Muhammad to 1250
  13. Western Europe: Late Middle Ages
  14. Manuscript Book Market on the Eve of the Gutenberg Press
  15. Comparison of Book Cultures Over Geographical Time and Space
  16. Wrap-Up and Review (1/2 week)

For each of these topics we will study the following

  • Basic terms and concepts for each civilization
  • An overview of history and geography for each civilization
  • The book and reading culture of each society we study in terms of
    • Language
    • Book medium, format, and method of applying text to medium
    • Content, Book production and distribution techniques
    • Audience and Literacy
  • Student’s personal digital course “library”: built through online searching activity
  • Characteristics of the civilization that contribute to the shape of the book culture
  • Compare current book culture with others we have studied, noting similarities and differences

Course Format and Teaching Methods

  • 445: lecture Monday; face2face discussion Wed; weekly terminology quiz (D2L); Question sets turned in at the end of each unit (Dropbox); Class Library forum (D2L with 545 students); Personal Course Library Project (made with student’s personal choice of media);
  •  

Required Course Materials: 

Required Texts

The required text is A Companion to the History of the Book, edited by Simon Eliot and Jonathan Rose, Blackwell Publishing, 2007, 2008 or 2009. This text comes in print and PDF electronic versions. The electronic version is available through the University Library. For those who prefer print, there is a paperback print version available through Amazon and other vendors

Each unit will also include one or more required readings and videos which will be available through links in D2L.

Optional Special Materials:

DK Publishing Eyewitness Series,  for The Book, Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, China, Islam. These are available from public libraries and from Amazon. Their audience is older children, but the presentation that results makes the information accessible and enjoyable to learners of all ages.

Recommended Knowledge

Everyone will bring some background to the course, and the diversity will enrich discussion.

Course Requirements: 

Undergraduates

  • Attendance at the lecture/discussion (Monday) and the Discussion Section (Wed)
  • Written question set turned at end of every unit, 250 words
  • Terminology Quiz for every unit
  • Class Collection Forum
    • Contributions: Posting 1-3 books for each unit
    • Discussion: Discussion of postings of others 1-3
    • Reading the posting of others 80-100%
  • Terminology Exam: Mid-term and Final
  • Written Exam (Short Answer): Midterm and Final
  • Personal Digital Collection: Books Before Gutenberg
    • Choose a digital collection method from list distributed
    • Create a Digital Collection with the following components
      • Introduction: Focus of the Collection
      • Entries in the collection
        • Entries are descriptions of 1-3 books from each unit studied
        • Entries include
          • Key identifying elements:
          • Other distinguishing information
          • Illustrations pasted into the entry
          • Link to the illustration and more information
          • Original analytical or comparative reflection
          • Citation of all words in entry not your own
        • Bibliography: 1-3 authoritative websites; 1-3 scholarly articles about the period or individual books
        •  

Course Grading: 

Grading Policy:

Undergraduates are expected to demonstrate accuracy, insight, and analysis, the extent of each determining the position in the A and B range.

Details of these general principles appear in the tables below.

Course Grading: 

 

Assignment

Points Per Assignment

 

Undergraduate

 Weighting

Participation, including discussion and blog

(semester aggregate)

100 points for semester grade, which is an aggregate of weekly grades

10%

Weekly Quizzes (semester aggregate)

100 points for semester grade, which is an aggregate of weekly grades

10%

Class Collection Contributions

100 points for semester grade, which is an aggregate of weekly grades

10%

Mid-Term Terminology Quiz

100 points

15%

Mid-Term Essay Exam

100 points

15%

Final Terminology Exam

100 points

10%

Final Essay Exam

100 points

15%

Personal Digital Library

100 points

25%

 

Grading Criteria

 

Assignment

Undergraduate

 

Quantity

Quality

Participation,

In Class

B: Moderate (2Xw)

A: Active (4Xw)

In Class

B accurate, somewhat insightful

A shows insight, some analysis and comparison

Weekly Quizzes

B: 80-90%

A: 90-100%

Class Library Contributions

1-3 contributions

  • in period
  • illustration
  • extent of text
  • appropriate citation
  • comparative comment
  • link

1-3 comments on others

Reading 80-100%

B accurate, somewhat insightful

A shows insight, some analysis and comparison

Mid-Term Terminology Quiz

B: 80-90%

A: 90-100%

Mid-Term Written Exam

 

 

Final Terminology Exam

B range: 80-90%

A range: 90-100%

Written Exam

Short Answers

B range:

  • Supports some-many assertions with accurate facts
  • Shows some sense of dates, geography and historical periods
  • Provides 1 central defining feature
  • Organization: does not interfere with reader’s understanding
  • Use of wording, grammar, punctuation does not interfere with reader’s understanding
  • Some but not many compositional errors

A range

  • Supports many-most all assertions with accurate facts;
  • shows strong sense of dates and historical periods, civilizations, and book cultures
  • Provides several defining feature or details
  • Organization: very clear to reader, strong ideas
  • Use of wording, grammar, punctuation make strong points clear to reader; few ordinary compositional errors

Personal Digital Library

B range: Requirements for Undergraduates: low to medium-high quantity and quality

  • Quantity and quality ranging from adequate to good/very good

A range: high end of activity

  • Quantity and quality ranging from strong to very strong

 

Grading Scale

All grades will be converted to 1 to 100, but some may start out 1-10

10, 9 or 100-90

A

  8 or 89-80

B

  7 or 79-70

C

  6 or 69-60

D

  5 - 0 or 59 - 0

E

 

 

Course Policies: 

Incomplete Policy

Requests for incompletes (I) and withdrawal (W) must be made in accordance with university policies which are available at http://catalog.arizona.edu/2012-13/policies/grade.htm#I and http://catalog.arizona.edu/2012-13/policies/grade.htm#W respectively.
 

Honors Credit

Students wishing to contract this course for Honors Credit should email me to set up an appointment to discuss the terms of the contact and to sign the Honors Course Contract Request Form.  The form is available at http://www.honors.arizona.edu/documents/students/ContractRequestFrom.pdf.

Late Work Policy

As a rule, work will not be accepted late except in case of documented emergency or illness. You may petition the professor in writing for an exception if you feel you have a compelling reason for turning work in late.

Attendance Policy
 

The UA’s policy concerning Class Attendance and Administrative Drops is available at: http://catalog.arizona.edu/2012-13/policies/classatten.htm 
 

The UA policy regarding absences on and accommodation of religious holidays is available at http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/religiousobservanceandpractice.

Absences pre-approved by the UA Dean of Students (or Dean designee) will be honored.  See: http://uhap.web.arizona.edu/chapter_7#7.04.02

Participating in course and attending lectures and other course events are vital to the learning process.  As such, listening/viewing is required all lectures, as is attendance at discussion section meetings, whether in person or in D2L.  Undergraduate students who miss class due to illness or emergency are required to bring documentation from their healthcare provider or other relevant, professional third parties. Failure to submit third-party documentation will result in unexcused absences.  

Graduate students are required to make up the work they miss within a week of their absence. For longer illnesses, get in touch with the instructor.
 

Assignment/Testing Schedule/Due Dates/Assignment Format: 

 

Wks

Dates

Topics

Weekly Assignmt, Due Dates, Deposit requirements

Due Dates in Semestr,Depos requirement

1

8/26-9/1

Introduction to the class and to historical time designations

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

 

9/2-8

Mesopotamia

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

3

9/9-15

Ancient Africa and Egypt

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

  • All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

4

9/16-/22

Ancient Greece

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

5

9/23-29

Hellenistic Greek Empire

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

6

9/30-10/6

Ancient Rome to the Fall of the Western Roman Empire

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

7

10/7-13

China—Ancient/Middle Ages, part 1

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

8

10/14-20

Mid-term review and mid-terms

 

Undergraduate: terminology exam in D2L

Short-answer exam in Wed, 10-16 class

Graduate: All D2D exams.

All D2L exams in D2L: open Wed night, 10/16, 11:59 p, and close Sunday night/10/20, 11:59 p

9

10/21-27

Eastern Roman Empire from Constantine to fall of Eastern Empire

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

10

10/28-11/3

India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

11

11/4-10

Western Europe: early Middle Ages

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

12

11/11-17

Islam and the Arabic Empire from Muhammad to 1250

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

13

11/18-24

Manuscript Book Market on the Eve of the Gutenberg Press

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

14

11/25-27

11/28-12-1

Personal Digital Library—progress and sharing

Thanksgiving Vacation

 

 

15

12/2-8

Comparison across study units

  • Lecture

 F2F Monday

  • Reading,

before discussion, Wed

  • Discussion

F2F Wed

Question Set; Class Collection posts D2l, Blog separate link

All 3 above by Sun, 11/59 pm

 

16

12/9-11

Wrap-Up and Review (1/2 week)

 

 

17

12/12

Reading Day

 

 

18

12/13-16

Exams on D2L

 

 

 

Classroom Behavior

To foster a positive learning environment, students in face2face classes may not text, chat, make phone calls, play games, read the newspaper or surf the web during lecture and discussion. Students engaging in the activities about will be asked to leave the class and will receive unexcused absences. Students are asked to follow these rules on the honor system. Students who break these rules anyway may receive additional penalties for not following honor system policies.

Students are asked to refrain from disruptive conversations with people sitting around them during lecture.  Students observed engaging in disruptive activity will be asked to cease this behavior.  Students who continue to disrupt the class will be asked to leave lecture or discussion and may be reported to the Dean of Students. Disruptive activity in class or D2L is any language or activity that interferes with learning and that is disrespectful to the learning and teaching going on the class. Students who wish to take up issues of learning and teaching should make an appointment, in person or virtually, to discuss this with the instructor.

Some learning styles are best served by using personal electronics, such as laptops and iPads.   These devices can be distracting to some learners.  Therefore, people who prefer to use electronic devices for note-taking during lecture should use one side of the classroom. Students using laptops for any activity other than taking notes in this class will be asked to leave the class and will receive unexcused absences. Students are asked to follow these rules on the honor system. Students who break these rules anyway may receive additional penalties for not following honor system policies.

The Arizona Board of Regents’ Student Code of Conduct, ABOR Policy 5-308, prohibits threats of physical harm to any member of the University community, including to one’s self.  See: http://policy.arizona.edu/threatening-behavior-students.

Notification of Cross-Cultural Material

This is a history course that studies multiple global cultures in existence before 1447. Students are asked to recognize their own cultural beliefs and their own strength in holding them. This is positive awareness. Historical study often involves studying cultures that hold different beliefs from yours. Be sure to realize that you are not being asked to change your beliefs. You are being asked to study other belief systems in an historical and academic way. This in no way is intended to supplant your belief system, but to encourage you to learn about others. Such learning is deemed important for studying history and for the learning process.  Students are not excused from interacting with such materials. If they wish to compare them with their beliefs, they should do so in respectful and well-reasoned ways.

Accessibility and Accommodations
It is the University’s goal that learning experiences be as accessible as possible.  If you anticipate or experience physical or academic barriers based on disability, please let me know immediately so that we can discuss options.  You are also welcome to contact Disability Resources (520-621-3268) to establish reasonable accommodations.  For additional information on Disability Resources and reasonable accommodations, please visit 
http://drc.arizona.edu/.

If you have reasonable accommodations, please plan to meet with me by appointment or during office hours to discuss accommodations and how my course requirements and activities may impact your ability to fully participate.

Please be aware that the accessible table and chairs in this room should remain available for students who find that standard classroom seating is not usable.

Student Code of Academic Integrity
Students are encouraged to share intellectual views and discuss freely the principles and applications of course materials. However, graded work/exercises must be the product of independent effort unless otherwise instructed. Students are expected to adhere to the UA Code of Academic Integrity as described in the UA General Catalog. See: http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/codeofacademicintegrity.

The University Libraries have some excellent tips for avoiding plagiarism available at:  http://www.library.arizona.edu/help/tutorials/plagiarism/index.html.

According to Section D (6) (a) of the University’s Intellectual Property Policy (which is available at http://www.ott.arizona.edu/uploads/ip_policy.pdf), faculty own the intellectual property for their course notes and course materials.   The instructor holds the copyright to his/her lectures and course materials, including student notes or summaries that substantially reflect them.  Student notes and course recordings are for individual use or for shared use on an individual basis.  Selling class notes and/or other course materials to other students or to a third party for resale is not permitted without the instructor’s express written consent.  Violations to the instructor’s copyright are subject to the Code of Academic Integrity and may result in course sanctions.  Additionally, students who use D2L or UA email to sell or buy these copyrighted materials are subject to Code of Conduct Violations for misuse of student email addresses.

Additional Resources for Students

  1. UA Non-discrimination and Anti-harassment policy: http://policy.arizona.edu/sites/default/files/Nondiscrimination.pdf
  2. UA Academic policies and procedures are available at:
    http://catalog.arizona.edu/2012-13/policies/aaindex.html
  3. Student Assistance and Advocacy information is available at:

http://deanofstudents.arizona.edu/studentassistanceandadvocacy

Confidentiality of Student Records

http://www.registrar.arizona.edu/ferpa/default.htm

Subject to Change Statement

Information contained in the course syllabus, other than the grade and absence policy, may be subject to change with advance notice, as deemed appropriate by the instructor.

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
 
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